One Last Call to Amelia

LETA

4☆babbler
Staff
p64P2m8.jpg

Image: U.S. Coast Guard

The mysterious vanishing of Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan almost a hundred years ago, is one of the most prominent riddles in aviation's history. Their final resting place, at an unknown location somewhere in the Pacific Ocean, continues to vex historians and explorers alike; who would like to put an end to the continuous search now spanning close to a century.

In order to solve this enduring mystery, three East Coast companies are joining forces and resources to recreate the fateful flight's communications between the Lockheed Electra airplane and the US Coast Guard Cutter Itasca, the last known vessel to receive Amelia's distress radio signals before the transmissions went dark:

What we’re going to do is simulate the actual flight into what would be Itasca and simulate that flight that lasts part of her flight in 1937.

The ambitious simulation, which will be conducted at the end of this month (September) off the coast of Virginia in the Atlantic Ocean, will make use of a similar vintage model airplane furnished with period-accurate communications equipment in the hopes of triangulating and measuring the strength of the signals bouncing between the aircraft and the Navy ship:

It makes a perfect platform then for us to add on high-frequency antennas on it and direction-finding loop like she had on hers. Through the tests we can narrow down the band of how far was she for her last several transmissions.

When the test flight is completed, the team will analyze the gathered data using modern GPS technology to extrapolate Earhart's final location in the Pacific. If successful, they hope to retrieve the missing aircraft - or whatever remains of it - and bring it back to California for one last commemorative flight.

 
  • Like
Reactions: August
D

Dundee

Guest
That should be really interesting. I saw years ago a pretty compelling doco that said they had evidence she crashed near a Japaese held Island and given it was right at the start of the war they said nothing. Japanese records indicated a woman prisoner whose circumstances fitted hers. can't remember more than that other than the evidence was strong.
 
P

plutronus

Guest
p64P2m8.jpg

Image: U.S. Coast Guard

The mysterious vanishing of Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan almost a hundred years ago, is one of the most prominent riddles in aviation's history. Their final resting place, at an unknown location somewhere in the Pacific Ocean, continues to vex historians and explorers alike; who would like to put an end to the continuous search now spanning close to a century.

In order to solve this enduring mystery, three East Coast companies are joining forces and resources to recreate the fateful flight's communications between the Lockheed Electra airplane and the US Coast Guard Cutter Itasca, the last known vessel to receive Amelia's distress radio signals before the transmissions went dark:



The ambitious simulation, which will be conducted at the end of this month (September) off the coast of Virginia in the Atlantic Ocean, will make use of a similar vintage model airplane furnished with period-accurate communications equipment in the hopes of triangulating and measuring the strength of the signals bouncing between the aircraft and the Navy ship:



When the test flight is completed, the team will analyze the gathered data using modern GPS technology to extrapolate Earhart's final location in the Pacific. If successful, they hope to retrieve the missing aircraft - or whatever remains of it - and bring it back to California for one last commemorative flight.

I understand that this is a dated thread. However, there is a group of Ph.D.s who search for missing aircraft, they got money, resources and they do their search as a hobby. The group is directed by Dr. Gillespi (as I recall his name spelling) for the group TIGHR, which I've forgotten what it means. But in any case, they have, in my opinion, located where Amelia Earhart landed with Noonan and where she and Noonan died. They even have tracked down components of the Lockheed Electra, which Gillespi and his group believe has slid down an ocean cliff in about 700 ft /250m of water.

If one were to expend any time reading their website and all the naively retarded behaviors the Ms Earhart did, one can easily deduce that she was an idiot and died as result. For one, when she pulled out the new technology Bendix direction finder that was purposely engineered into her airplane, for the mission, but pulled it out, to put in more gas cans which the airplane was not designed to carry, eg., decreasing the the weight/fuel/flight-time ratio (stupid), and then when she took from Madgascar, on a non-paved runway, a fellow at the airport took 16mm movie film of her takeoff. On the film one can see that the airplane was so over-weight, that when the airplane rolled over a bump, that the landing-gear struts bottomed out, and something that appeared to be 'smoke' emitted from the airplane. Later that evening the fellow walked out to the runway and found Ms Earhart's radio receiver's antenna, which was grounded off when the struts bottomed out!!! She took off, straight out into the ocean without testing her two-way radio!!! That it is fairly stupid. The destroyer that the DoD sent out to the island, where SeaBees made a runway and created a refueling station, where Ms Earhart was supposed to be guided to by the radio operators on the destroyer. The destroyer radio operators could hear her, but she could not hear their instructions as her receiver had no antenna. She was way off course. There is multiple evidence that she landed on a reef at low-tide, on Nikmaru Island.

Its a fascinating journey of how the TIGHR group forensically peiced all the information together, But she was a media hungry, spoiled, wife of a wealthy publisher who cluelessly did things that killed her.

See: https://tighar.org/